CWBA IN THE NEWS

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  • September 22, 2014 9:00 AM | Kim Sporrer, APR (Administrator)

    Law Week Colorado - by Hannah Garcia

    The Judicial nomination process in Colorado relies on a "merit selection" plan and has since 1966, designed to remove political motives by avoiding elections.  Although it's not a democratic system, it strives to be a pluralistic one.

    Specialty bars in the state have added another layer of scrutiny to the judge selection process for years.  When a district or state judicial vacancy opens, the applications of interested attorneys are forwarded to a nomination commission within the district, which whittles the list down and typically sends three final nominees to the governor's office.  The nomination commissions comprise three attorneys and four non-attorneys with no more than four members belonging to one political party.

    The process is similar for Denver county judgeships, except nominees go to Mayor Michael Hancock.

    After receiving the final nominees, the governor then has 15 days to investigate and make an appointment.  Within those 15 days, specialty bars including the Asian Pacific American Bar Association of Colorado, the Colorado Women's Bar Association, the Colorado Hispanic Bar Association and the Colorado GLBT Bar Association aid in that investigatory phase with their own due diligence.  Each has their own review process, differing in scope and intensity, but all say it's a vital part of the process.

    Click here for the full article.

    Law Week Colorado - by Hannah Garcia

    The Judicial nomination process in Colorado relies on a "merit selection" plan and has since 1966, designed to remove political motives by avoiding elections.  Although it's not a democratic system, it strives to be a pluralistic one.

    Specialty bars in the state have added another layer of scrutiny to the judge selection process for years.  When a district or state judicial vacancy opens, the applications of interested attorneys are forwarded to a nomination commission within the district, which whittles the list down and typically sends three final nominees to the governor's office.  The nomination commissions comprise three attorneys and four non-attorneys with no more than four members belonging to one poitical party.

    The process is similar for Denver county judgeships, except nominees go to Mayor Michael Hancock.

    After receiving the final nominees, the governor then has 15 days to investigate and make an appointment.  Within those 15 days, specialty bars including the Asian Pacific American Bar Association of Colorado, the Colorado Women's Bar Association, the Colorado Hispanic Bar Association and the Colorado GLBT Bar Association aid in that investigatory phase with their own due diligence.  Each has their own review process, differing in scope and intensity, but all say it's a vital part of the process.

    Click here for the full article.

  • August 15, 2014 9:30 AM | Kim Sporrer, APR (Administrator)

    Denver Business Journal - by Heather Draper

    Attorney Alison Zinn is a woman on the move. And she wants other women to move with her — up the legal ladder. 

    Zinn, the new president of the Colorado Women’s Bar Association, can tick off — from memory — a checklist of her goals for the organization in the next year. 

    It’s not short.

    She’s driven to keep more women in the legal profession, as statistics show that women don’t stay in the profession at the rate their male colleagues do. 

    Zinn likes the words “excite,” “empower” and “embrace” to describe the work she’ll do to build on the momentum the CWBA has created toward its mission of protecting and promoting the welfare of all women in Colorado. 

    “I want us to embrace each other on the issues that unite us, and make our membership more inclusive,” said Zinn, a senior associate at Wade Ash Woods Hill & Farley, specializing in litigation involving wills, trusts and probate fiduciaries.


    CWBA has grown to nearly 800 members, making it the largest specialty bar association in the state. The organization wants to grow to 1,000 members within a few years.  “We want to keep growing and being impactful and influential,” Zinn said. 

    She had a big part in leading efforts this spring to refresh CWBA’s brand. In the first few weeks of her new leadership role, Zinn and her committee members revamped the quarterly newsletter, hired a part-time marketing director to increase awareness and encourage growth and helped organize a mixer with other “minority/specialty” bar associations to foster more collaboration and diversity.

    She’s also developing a new way to track women applying for judicial appointments, as one of her biggest passions is getting more women on the bench.

    “We keep hearing from government officials that the ‘pipeline’s low on women’ for judge appointments,” she said. “But what does that mean? There’s no data out there to explain that.”

    CWBA is working with officials in Gov. John Hickenlooper’s office and others to help women identify themselves as judicial candidates and help them with the application process. And also to collect data on who is applying.

    Zinn said CWBA has had a recurring theme of women “getting benched,” but she wants to change that notion to “storming the bench.”

    “It has more of active connotation,” she said.

    The other thing CWBA will continue to focus on is community service, said Zinn, who is involved with several nonprofits in metro Denver.

    “I joined the women’s bar because it was an easy way to do community service,” she said. “I know other members felt the same way. It’s humbling what our profession does to give back.”

    Photo by Kathleen Lavine | Denver Business Journal

    Heather Draper covers banking, finance, law and sports business for the Denver Business Journal and writes for the "Finance Etc." blog. 

    Denver Business Journal - Heather Draper


    Attorney Alison Zinn is a woman on the move. And she wants other women to move with her — up the legal ladder. 


    Zinn, the new president of the Colorado Women’s Bar Association, can tick off — from memory — a checklist of her goals for the organization in the next year. 


    It’s not short.


    She’s driven to keep more women in the legal profession, as statistics show that women don’t stay in the profession at the rate their male colleagues do. 


    Zinn likes the words “excite,” “empower” and “embrace” to describe the work she’ll do to build on the momentum the CWBA has created toward its mission of protecting and promoting the welfare of all women in Colorado. 


    “I want us to embrace each other on the issues that unite us, and make our membership more inclusive,” said Zinn, a senior associate at Wade Ash Woods Hill & Farley, specializing in litigation involving wills, trusts and probate fiduciaries.




    CWBA has grown to nearly 800 members, making it the largest specialty bar association in the state. The organization wants to grow to 1,000 members within a few years.  “We want to keep growing and being impactful and influential,” Zinn said. 


    She had a big part in leading efforts this spring to refresh CWBA’s brand. In the first few weeks of her new leadership role, Zinn and her committee members revamped the quarterly newsletter, hired a part-time marketing director to increase awareness and encourage growth and helped organize a mixer with other “minority/specialty” bar associations to foster more collaboration and diversity.


    She’s also developing a new way to track women applying for judicial appointments, as one of her biggest passions is getting more women on the bench.


    “We keep hearing from government officials that the ‘pipeline’s low on women’ for judge appointments,” she said. “But what does that mean? There’s no data out there to explain that.”


    CWBA is working with officials in Gov. John Hickenlooper’s office and others to help women identify themselves as judicial candidates and help them with the application process. And also to collect data on who is applying.


    Zinn said CWBA has had a recurring theme of women “getting benched,” but she wants to change that notion to “storming the bench.”


    “It has more of active connotation,” she said.


    The other thing CWBA will continue to focus on is community service, said Zinn, who is involved with several nonprofits in metro Denver.


    “I joined the women’s bar because it was an easy way to do community service,” she said. “I know other members felt the same way. It’s humbling what our profession does to give back.”


    Photo by Kathleen Lavine | Denver Business Journal


    Heather Draper covers banking, finance, law and sports business for the Denver Business Journal and writes for the "Finance Etc." blog. Denver Business Journal - Heather Draper


    Attorney Alison Zinn is a woman on the move. And she wants other women to move with her — up the legal ladder. 


    Zinn, the new president of the Colorado Women’s Bar Association, can tick off — from memory — a checklist of her goals for the organization in the next year. 


    It’s not short.


    She’s driven to keep more women in the legal profession, as statistics show that women don’t stay in the profession at the rate their male colleagues do. 


    Zinn likes the words “excite,” “empower” and “embrace” to describe the work she’ll do to build on the momentum the CWBA has created toward its mission of protecting and promoting the welfare of all women in Colorado. 


    “I want us to embrace each other on the issues that unite us, and make our membership more inclusive,” said Zinn, a senior associate at Wade Ash Woods Hill & Farley, specializing in litigation involving wills, trusts and probate fiduciaries.




    CWBA has grown to nearly 800 members, making it the largest specialty bar association in the state. The organization wants to grow to 1,000 members within a few years.  “We want to keep growing and being impactful and influential,” Zinn said. 


    She had a big part in leading efforts this spring to refresh CWBA’s brand. In the first few weeks of her new leadership role, Zinn and her committee members revamped the quarterly newsletter, hired a part-time marketing director to increase awareness and encourage growth and helped organize a mixer with other “minority/specialty” bar associations to foster more collaboration and diversity.


    She’s also developing a new way to track women applying for judicial appointments, as one of her biggest passions is getting more women on the bench.


    “We keep hearing from government officials that the ‘pipeline’s low on women’ for judge appointments,” she said. “But what does that mean? There’s no data out there to explain that.”


    CWBA is working with officials in Gov. John Hickenlooper’s office and others to help women identify themselves as judicial candidates and help them with the application process. And also to collect data on who is applying.


    Zinn said CWBA has had a recurring theme of women “getting benched,” but she wants to change that notion to “storming the bench.”


    “It has more of active connotation,” she said.


    The other thing CWBA will continue to focus on is community service, said Zinn, who is involved with several nonprofits in metro Denver.


    “I joined the women’s bar because it was an easy way to do community service,” she said. “I know other members felt the same way. It’s humbling what our profession does to give back.”


    Photo by Kathleen Lavine | Denver Business Journal


    Heather Draper covers banking, finance, law and sports business for the Denver Business Journal and writes for the "Finance Etc." blog. Denver Business Journal - Heather Draper


    Attorney Alison Zinn is a woman on the move. And she wants other women to move with her — up the legal ladder. 


    Zinn, the new president of the Colorado Women’s Bar Association, can tick off — from memory — a checklist of her goals for the organization in the next year. 


    It’s not short.


    She’s driven to keep more women in the legal profession, as statistics show that women don’t stay in the profession at the rate their male colleagues do. 


    Zinn likes the words “excite,” “empower” and “embrace” to describe the work she’ll do to build on the momentum the CWBA has created toward its mission of protecting and promoting the welfare of all women in Colorado. 


    “I want us to embrace each other on the issues that unite us, and make our membership more inclusive,” said Zinn, a senior associate at Wade Ash Woods Hill & Farley, specializing in litigation involving wills, trusts and probate fiduciaries.




    CWBA has grown to nearly 800 members, making it the largest specialty bar association in the state. The organization wants to grow to 1,000 members within a few years.  “We want to keep growing and being impactful and influential,” Zinn said. 


    She had a big part in leading efforts this spring to refresh CWBA’s brand. In the first few weeks of her new leadership role, Zinn and her committee members revamped the quarterly newsletter, hired a part-time marketing director to increase awareness and encourage growth and helped organize a mixer with other “minority/specialty” bar associations to foster more collaboration and diversity.


    She’s also developing a new way to track women applying for judicial appointments, as one of her biggest passions is getting more women on the bench.


    “We keep hearing from government officials that the ‘pipeline’s low on women’ for judge appointments,” she said. “But what does that mean? There’s no data out there to explain that.”


    CWBA is working with officials in Gov. John Hickenlooper’s office and others to help women identify themselves as judicial candidates and help them with the application process. And also to collect data on who is applying.


    Zinn said CWBA has had a recurring theme of women “getting benched,” but she wants to change that notion to “storming the bench.”


    “It has more of active connotation,” she said.


    The other thing CWBA will continue to focus on is community service, said Zinn, who is involved with several nonprofits in metro Denver.


    “I joined the women’s bar because it was an easy way to do community service,” she said. “I know other members felt the same way. It’s humbling what our profession does to give back.”


    Photo by Kathleen Lavine | Denver Business Journal


    Heather Draper covers banking, finance, law and sports business for the Denver Business Journal and writes for the "Finance Etc." blog. 

    Denver Business Journal - Heather Draper


    Attorney Alison Zinn is a woman on the move. And she wants other women to move with her — up the legal ladder. 


    Zinn, the new president of the Colorado Women’s Bar Association, can tick off — from memory — a checklist of her goals for the organization in the next year. 


    It’s not short.


    She’s driven to keep more women in the legal profession, as statistics show that women don’t stay in the profession at the rate their male colleagues do. 


    Zinn likes the words “excite,” “empower” and “embrace” to describe the work she’ll do to build on the momentum the CWBA has created toward its mission of protecting and promoting the welfare of all women in Colorado. 


    “I want us to embrace each other on the issues that unite us, and make our membership more inclusive,” said Zinn, a senior associate at Wade Ash Woods Hill & Farley, specializing in litigation involving wills, trusts and probate fiduciaries.




    CWBA has grown to nearly 800 members, making it the largest specialty bar association in the state. The organization wants to grow to 1,000 members within a few years.  “We want to keep growing and being impactful and influential,” Zinn said. 


    She had a big part in leading efforts this spring to refresh CWBA’s brand. In the first few weeks of her new leadership role, Zinn and her committee members revamped the quarterly newsletter, hired a part-time marketing director to increase awareness and encourage growth and helped organize a mixer with other “minority/specialty” bar associations to foster more collaboration and diversity.


    She’s also developing a new way to track women applying for judicial appointments, as one of her biggest passions is getting more women on the bench.


    “We keep hearing from government officials that the ‘pipeline’s low on women’ for judge appointments,” she said. “But what does that mean? There’s no data out there to explain that.”


    CWBA is working with officials in Gov. John Hickenlooper’s office and others to help women identify themselves as judicial candidates and help them with the application process. And also to collect data on who is applying.


    Zinn said CWBA has had a recurring theme of women “getting benched,” but she wants to change that notion to “storming the bench.”


    “It has more of active connotation,” she said.


    The other thing CWBA will continue to focus on is community service, said Zinn, who is involved with several nonprofits in metro Denver.


    “I joined the women’s bar because it was an easy way to do community service,” she said. “I know other members felt the same way. It’s humbling what our profession does to give back.”


    Photo by Kathleen Lavine | Denver Business Journal


    Heather Draper covers banking, finance, law and sports business for the Denver Business Journal and writes for the "Finance Etc." blog. 

    Denver Business Journal - Heather Draper


    Attorney Alison Zinn is a woman on the move. And she wants other women to move with her — up the legal ladder. 


    Zinn, the new president of the Colorado Women’s Bar Association, can tick off — from memory — a checklist of her goals for the organization in the next year. 


    It’s not short.


    She’s driven to keep more women in the legal profession, as statistics show that women don’t stay in the profession at the rate their male colleagues do. 


    Zinn likes the words “excite,” “empower” and “embrace” to describe the work she’ll do to build on the momentum the CWBA has created toward its mission of protecting and promoting the welfare of all women in Colorado. 


    “I want us to embrace each other on the issues that unite us, and make our membership more inclusive,” said Zinn, a senior associate at Wade Ash Woods Hill & Farley, specializing in litigation involving wills, trusts and probate fiduciaries.




    CWBA has grown to nearly 800 members, making it the largest specialty bar association in the state. The organization wants to grow to 1,000 members within a few years.  “We want to keep growing and being impactful and influential,” Zinn said. 


    She had a big part in leading efforts this spring to refresh CWBA’s brand. In the first few weeks of her new leadership role, Zinn and her committee members revamped the quarterly newsletter, hired a part-time marketing director to increase awareness and encourage growth and helped organize a mixer with other “minority/specialty” bar associations to foster more collaboration and diversity.


    She’s also developing a new way to track women applying for judicial appointments, as one of her biggest passions is getting more women on the bench.


    “We keep hearing from government officials that the ‘pipeline’s low on women’ for judge appointments,” she said. “But what does that mean? There’s no data out there to explain that.”


    CWBA is working with officials in Gov. John Hickenlooper’s office and others to help women identify themselves as judicial candidates and help them with the application process. And also to collect data on who is applying.


    Zinn said CWBA has had a recurring theme of women “getting benched,” but she wants to change that notion to “storming the bench.”


    “It has more of active connotation,” she said.


    The other thing CWBA will continue to focus on is community service, said Zinn, who is involved with several nonprofits in metro Denver.


    “I joined the women’s bar because it was an easy way to do community service,” she said. “I know other members felt the same way. It’s humbling what our profession does to give back.”


    Photo by Kathleen Lavine | Denver Business Journal


    Heather Draper covers banking, finance, law and sports business for the Denver Business Journal and writes for the "Finance Etc." blog. 

    Denver Business Journal - Heather Draper

    Attorney Alison Zinn is a woman on the move. And she wants other women to move with her — up the legal ladder. 

    Zinn, the new president of the Colorado Women’s Bar Association, can tick off — from memory — a checklist of her goals for the organization in the next year. 

    It’s not short.

    She’s driven to keep more women in the legal profession, as statistics show that women don’t stay in the profession at the rate their male colleagues do. 

    Zinn likes the words “excite,” “empower” and “embrace” to describe the work she’ll do to build on the momentum the CWBA has created toward its mission of protecting and promoting the welfare of all women in Colorado. 

    “I want us to embrace each other on the issues that unite us, and make our membership more inclusive,” said Zinn, a senior associate at Wade Ash Woods Hill & Farley, specializing in litigation involving wills, trusts and probate fiduciaries.

    CWBA has grown to nearly 800 members, making it the largest specialty bar association in the state. The organization wants to grow to 1,000 members within a few years.  “We want to keep growing and being impactful and influential,” Zinn said. 

    She had a big part in leading efforts this spring to refresh CWBA’s brand. In the first few weeks of her new leadership role, Zinn and her committee members revamped the quarterly newsletter, hired a part-time marketing director to increase awareness and encourage growth and helped organize a mixer with other “minority/specialty” bar associations to foster more collaboration and diversity.

    She’s also developing a new way to track women applying for judicial appointments, as one of her biggest passions is getting more women on the bench.

    “We keep hearing from government officials that the ‘pipeline’s low on women’ for judge appointments,” she said. “But what does that mean? There’s no data out there to explain that.”

    CWBA is working with officials in Gov. John Hickenlooper’s office and others to help women identify themselves as judicial candidates and help them with the application process. And also to collect data on who is applying.

    Zinn said CWBA has had a recurring theme of women “getting benched,” but she wants to change that notion to “storming the bench.”

    “It has more of active connotation,” she said.

    The other thing CWBA will continue to focus on is community service, said Zinn, who is involved with several nonprofits in metro Denver.

    “I joined the women’s bar because it was an easy way to do community service,” she said. “I know other members felt the same way. It’s humbling what our profession does to give back.”

    Photo by Kathleen Lavine | Denver Business Journal

    Heather Draper covers banking, finance, law and sports business for the Denver Business Journal and writes for the "Finance Etc." blog. 





    Denver Business Journal - Heather Draper

    Attorney Alison Zinn is a woman on the move. And she wants other women to move with her — up the legal ladder. 

    Zinn, the new president of the Colorado Women’s Bar Association, can tick off — from memory — a checklist of her goals for the organization in the next year. 

    It’s not short.

    She’s driven to keep more women in the legal profession, as statistics show that women don’t stay in the profession at the rate their male colleagues do. 

    Zinn likes the words “excite,” “empower” and “embrace” to describe the work she’ll do to build on the momentum the CWBA has created toward its mission of protecting and promoting the welfare of all women in Colorado. 

    “I want us to embrace each other on the issues that unite us, and make our membership more inclusive,” said Zinn, a senior associate at Wade Ash Woods Hill & Farley, specializing in litigation involving wills, trusts and probate fiduciaries.

    CWBA has grown to nearly 800 members, making it the largest specialty bar association in the state. The organization wants to grow to 1,000 members within a few years.  “We want to keep growing and being impactful and influential,” Zinn said. 

    She had a big part in leading efforts this spring to refresh CWBA’s brand. In the first few weeks of her new leadership role, Zinn and her committee members revamped the quarterly newsletter, hired a part-time marketing director to increase awareness and encourage growth and helped organize a mixer with other “minority/specialty” bar associations to foster more collaboration and diversity.

    She’s also developing a new way to track women applying for judicial appointments, as one of her biggest passions is getting more women on the bench.

    “We keep hearing from government officials that the ‘pipeline’s low on women’ for judge appointments,” she said. “But what does that mean? There’s no data out there to explain that.”

    CWBA is working with officials in Gov. John Hickenlooper’s office and others to help women identify themselves as judicial candidates and help them with the application process. And also to collect data on who is applying.

    Zinn said CWBA has had a recurring theme of women “getting benched,” but she wants to change that notion to “storming the bench.”

    “It has more of active connotation,” she said.

    The other thing CWBA will continue to focus on is community service, said Zinn, who is involved with several nonprofits in metro Denver.

    “I joined the women’s bar because it was an easy way to do community service,” she said. “I know other members felt the same way. It’s humbling what our profession does to give back.”

    Photo by Kathleen Lavine | Denver Business Journal

    Heather Draper covers banking, finance, law and sports business for the Denver Business Journal and writes for the "Finance Etc." blog. 






  • July 14, 2014 10:00 AM | Kim Sporrer, APR (Administrator)

    The Colorado Women’s Bar Association (CWBA), a nonprofit organization focused on advancing and promoting women in the legal profession and the welfare of all women in Colorado, announces its 2014-2015 Board Leadership.

    The CWBA 2014-2015 President is Alison E. Zinn of Denver who began her one-year term on May 17, 2014. She joined the CWBA Board of Directors in 2009 and is also a member of the Colorado and Denver Bar Associations.

    Alison Zinn is a Senior Associate Attorney at Wade Ash Woods Hill & Farley, P.C. in Denver where she focuses on litigation involving wills, trusts, and probate fiduciaries. Her practice also includes guardian ad litem court appointments as well as contested and uncontested guardianship and conservatorship proceedings for the elderly, disabled, and children.

    Named a Super Lawyers Rising Star in 2013 and 2014, Zinn was also a 2013 finalist for the Gary McPherson Outstanding Young Lawyer Award from the Colorado Bar Association. She earned her undergraduate degree from University of Colorado, Boulder and her Juris Doctorate from the University of Denver Sturm College of Law.

    Through personal and professional philanthropic efforts, Zinn has been involved with Colorado Legal Services, Dressed For Success, Family Star, The Gathering Place, Habitat For Humanity, Komen Foundation, Denver and Boulder SafeHouses and Project Safeguard. She was featured in 5280 Magazine in December 2013 for her significant leadership and service contributions in Colorado. Read more...


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